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CONTENTS.


Page.
CHAPTER I.—INTRODUCTION 211
   Early migrations of the C̸egiha tribes 211
   Subsequent migrations of the Omahas 213
   Present state of the Omahas 214
CHAPTER II.—THE STATE 215
   Differentiation of organs in the State 216
   State classes 216
      Servants 217
   Corporations 218
CHAPTER III.—THE GENTILE SYSTEM 219
   Tribal circles 219
   The Omaha tribal circle 219
      Rules for pitching the tents 220
   The sacred tents 221
   The sacred pipes 221
      Ga̤hige's account of the tradition of the pipes 222
      Aⁿ-ba-hebe's account of the same 222
   Law of membership 225
   The Wejiⁿ cte or Elk gens 225
   The Ike-sabe or Black shoulder gens 228
   The Haga gens 233
   The C̸atada gens 236
      The Wasabe-hit'ajĭ subgens 236
      The Wajiga-c̷atajĭ subgens 218
      The eda-it'ajĭ subgens 239
      The ʞeiⁿ subgens 240
   The Kaⁿze gens 241
   The Maⁿc̷ika-gaze gens 242
   The e-sinde gens 244
   The a-da or Deer-head gens 245
   The Igc̷e-jide gens 247
   The Ictasanda gens 248
CHAPTER IV.—THE KINSHIP SYSTEM AND MARRIAGE LAWS 252
   Classes of kinship 252
      Consanguineous kinship 253
      Affinities 255
   Marriage laws 255
      Whom a man or woman cannot marry 256
      Whom a man or woman can marry 257
      Importance of the subgentes 258
      Remarriage 258
CHAPTER V.—DOMESTIC LIFE 259
   Courtship and marriage customs 259
   Domestic etiquette-bashfulness 262
   Pregnancy 263
   Children 265



  
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CHAPTER V.—DOMESTIC LIFE—Continued. Page
   Standing of women in society 266
   Catamenia 267
   Widows and widowers 267
   Rights of parents and others 268
   Personal habits, politeness, etc. 269
   Meals, etc. 271
CHAPTER VI.—VISITING CUSTOMS 276
CHAPTER VII.—INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS 283
   Hunting customs 283
   Fishing customs 301
   Cultivation of the ground 303
CHAPTER VIII.—INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS (CONTINUED) 303
   Food and its preparation 303
   Clothing and its preparation 310
CHAPTER IX.—PROTECTIVE INDUSTRIES 312
   War customs 312
      Defensive warfare 312
      Offensive warfare 315
CHAPTER X.—AMUSEMENTS AND CORPORATIONS 334
   Games 334
   Corporations 342
      Feasting societies 342
      Dancing societies 342
CHAPTER XI.—REGULATIVE INDUSTRIES 356
   The government 356
   Religion 363
CHAPTER XII.—THE LAW 364
   Personal law 364
   Property law 366
   Corporation law 367
   Government law 367
   International law 368
   Military law 368
   Religious law 368



  
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ILLUSTRATIONS.


Page.
PLATE XXX.—Map showing the migrations of the Omahas and cognate tribes 212
XXXI.—Tent of Agaha-wacuce 237
XXXII.—Omaha system of consanguinities 253
XXXIII.—Omaha system of affinities 255
FIG. 12.—The Omaha tribal circle 220
13.—Places of the chiefs, &c., in the tribal assembly 224
14.—Ike-sabe tent 230
15.—Ike-sabe style of wearing the hair 230
16.—Ike-sabe Gentile assembly 231
17.—The sacred pole 234
18.—Wasabe-hit'ajĭ style of wearing the hair 237
19.—e-sinde style of wearing the hair 244
20.—The weawaⁿ or calumet pipe 277
21.—Rattles used in the pipe dance 278
22.—The Dakota style of tobacco pouch used by the Omahas in the pipe dance 278
23.—The position of the pipes, the ear of corn, &c. 279
24.—Decoration of child's face 280
25.—Showing positions of the long tent, the pole, and rows of "ʇa" within the tribal circle 295
26.—Figures of pumpkins 306
27.—The Webajabe 310
28.—The Weubajaⁿ 311
29.—Front view of the iron 311
30.—Old Ponka fort 314
31.—Diagram showing places of the guests, messengers, etc. 315
32.—The banage 336
33.—The sticks 336
34.—Naⁿbaⁿ au hă 336
35.—C̸abc̷iⁿ au hă 337
36.—Diagram of the play-ground 337
37.—The stick used in playing dac̷iⁿ-jahe 338
38.—The wac̷igije 338
39.—The stick used in playing Iⁿtiⁿ-buʇa 341
40.—The waqc̷eqc̷e 'aⁿsa 352
41.—The Ponka style of haga-ʞi'aⁿze 359
42.—The Omaha style of haga-ʞi'aⁿze 361



  
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